7 Reasons Why Tropical Christmases Rule

If you imagine a traditional Christmas, you'll conjure up images of roaring log fires, icy cold weather and steaming mulled wine. There are however, some people whose Christmas is quite the opposite. They get to spend Christmas on a sandy beach, sipping cold margaritas and laying under sunny blue skies. So what’s it like spending Christmas in the the Caribbean vs. the typical winter wonderland we see in the movies?

1. It's Christmas bikinis instead of jumpers

The weather outside is delightful, and the idea of a log fire is frightful! There’s no place for a wooly jumper in 30 degree heat but that doesn’t mean you’re absolved of dressing up! In the Caribbean, it's all about grabbing a festive T-shirt, a Santa hat and some Christmas-coloured swimwear to get into the spirit.

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

2. Christmas decor is way cooler

Twinkling lights wrapped around a palm tree just look better. On an island where almost everything is imported, trees are shipped in which means that if you don’t snap one up quickly you'll miss out. This spices things up a bit and you'll find Christmas just about everywhere you look.

 

3. We don’t have to dream of a white Christmas.

White sand is just as good as snow!

Cayman Islands_Seven Mile Beach

 

4. Turkey isn’t the only thing you’ll eat

With so many different cultures sharing one small island, Christmas is a great time to try new food and delicacies from other nations and learn about traditions different from your own. Sorrel, stew beef and casava cake are a few of the truly Caymanian dishes you have to try!  If cooking’s not your thing you can dine out at one of the incredible brunches at some of the best restaurants across the island.

Photo Credit: Caribbean & Co

Photo Credit: Caribbean & Co

 

5. Gifting requires creativity

Unless you’re incredibly organised and shop off-island ahead of time, you’ll have to explore the boutiques around George Town, Camana Bay and along the Seven Mile Strip. There are no high-street chains in Cayman, but there’s an increasing number of unique stores selling gifts including crafts made by local artists - or you can make your own.

 

6. Your friends are your family

For expats, being away from family is tough, but when all of your friends live less than a 5 minute drive away, there’s never a more important time to be close with your “Cayman family” than at Christmas.

Christmas in Cayman

 

7. Santa doesn’t always come on his sleigh

Luckily the big man in a red suit is a resourceful chap so he’s found other means of transport to make it to the islands.

Camana Bay Parade of Lights

Camana Bay Parade of Lights

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

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Maya is a marketing professional by day, travel, photography and fitness nut by night. Originally a city girl from London, UK, she left the big smoke for Cayman in 2010 in pursuit of living the dream in paradise, and hasn't looked back since! Follow her adventures on instagram @caribbeansnowflake